help field note 1 page. single-space. focus: how would you change your field considering emdedded power relations?

help

field note

1 page. single-space. focus: how would you change your field considering emdedded power relations?

help field note 1 page. single-space. focus: how would you change your field considering emdedded power relations?
Field Notes Name Dr. Talha Issevenler SOC10500 Field Notes Feminist Ethnography Research that is done from a feminist perspective is known as feminist ethnography. It involves applying a feminist perspective to comprehend and analyze a specific culture, group, or situation. To better understand and challenge how gender and other social identities, such as race, class, sexual orientation, and ability, shape people’s experiences and the way they interact with one another and their environment, feminist ethnography aims to explore these social identities (Charmaz & Mitchell, 2001). To record the lived experiences and viewpoints of their research subjects, feminist ethnographers employ various qualitative research techniques and instruments, including interviews, participant observation, and document analysis. In the 1970s, feminist ethnography began as a reaction to conventional, predominately male research techniques. Previous research methodologies frequently ignored the perspectives of women, minorities, and other disadvantaged groups and the power relations between gender and other social identities. By highlighting the intersectionality of gender and other social identities and adopting a more comprehensive perspective to comprehend how people, communities, and societies are shaped by gender and other social identities, feminist ethnography aims to combat these biases. Understanding and opposing the social, political, and economic institutions that perpetuate gender inequality requires feminist ethnography. It enables academics to comprehend the intersections between gender, racism, class, sexuality, and other social identities that influence people’s lives, communities, and societies more deeply (Charmaz & Mitchell, 2001). The information gathered by feminist ethnographers is used to question the status quo and draw attention to the struggles of underrepresented communities. This may involve promoting policy changes, drawing attention to structural disparities, and spreading the word about the value of gender and other social identities in comprehending people, groups, and society. A potent tool for bringing about social change is feminist ethnography. Feminist ethnographers can challenge and disrupt oppressive power structures and create more equitable, inclusive, and just societies by highlighting the complexity of gender and other social identities and their intersectionality (Charmaz & Mitchell, 2001). Systemic injustices can be located, addressed, and the need for policy modifications that support equity and justice can be expressed through feminist ethnography. It can be used to locate and amplify the voices of marginalized and underrepresented groups and create a forum for communication and cooperation among various stakeholders. Understanding and combating gender-based oppression and the social, political, and economic systems that support inequality need feminist ethnography (Charmaz & Mitchell, 2001). Feminist ethnography can contribute to developing a more egalitarian, inclusive, and just society by drawing attention to the experiences of marginalized and underrepresented groups. Since it considers gender, power, and other types of oppression, feminist ethnography can give a more thorough and accurate picture of a phenomenon or a group of individuals. This kind of research can shed light on how gender and power interact in a certain setting and assist in dispelling preconceptions and preconceived notions about them. Feminist ethnography also has the benefit of aiding in the knowledge of the oppressed or marginalized population’s daily experiences. Feminist ethnography can contribute to developing a more just and equitable society by interacting with these individuals’ stories. Finding volunteers willing to share their experiences and stories might be challenging, which is a drawback. Feminist ethnography frequently necessitates long stays in the field, which can be time-consuming and expensive (Charmaz & Mitchell, 2001). Because it frequently focuses on the experiences of individuals who are disadvantaged or oppressed, feminist ethnography may be perceived as prejudiced or one-sided. Understanding and combating gender-based oppression and the social, political, and economic systems that support inequality need the use of feminist ethnography. Feminist ethnography offers a comprehensive viewpoint that enables researchers to understand how various identities impact people, communities, and societies by focusing on the intersections of gender and other social identities (Charmaz & Mitchell, 2001). By upending repressive power systems and pushing for legislative changes that advance equity and justice, its focus on the voices of marginalized and underrepresented groups can bring about social change. Feminist ethnography is a crucial tool for establishing a fairer, inclusive, and just society because of its ability to question and undermine preexisting power structures. The social injustices that exist have been made public by feminist ethnography. Feminist ethnographers have pinpointed and addressed the power dynamics that uphold gender inequality by examining how gender roles are created and reinforced. This research has also clarified how language and communication can be utilized to uphold and perpetuate gender-based oppression and discrimination. More proper research techniques have also been developed thanks to feminist ethnography. Feminist ethnographers have successfully highlighted lived realities and challenged prevailing narratives by focusing on the voices of those most impacted by gender inequality (Charmaz & Mitchell, 2001). This research has assisted in developing more equitable and inclusive methodologies by exposing the shortcomings of conventional research methodologies. Reference Charmaz, K., & Mitchell, R. G. (2001). Handbook of Ethnography. edited by Paul Atkinson, Amanda Coffey, Sara Delamont, John Lofland, and Lyn Lofland.

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